Steppe-Tundra Transition: A Herbivore-Driven Biome Shift at the End of the Pleistocene

@article{Zimov1995SteppeTundraTA,
  title={Steppe-Tundra Transition: A Herbivore-Driven Biome Shift at the End of the Pleistocene},
  author={Sergey Zimov and V. I. Chuprynin and A. P. Oreshko and F. Stuart Chapin and James F. Reynolds and Melissa C. Chapin},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1995},
  volume={146},
  pages={765 - 794}
}
A simulation model, recent experiments, and the literature provide consistent evidence that megafauna extinctions caused by human hunting could have played as great a role as climate in shifting from a vegetation mosaic with abundant grass-dominated steppe to a mosaic dominated by moss tundra in Beringia at the end of the Pleistocene. General circulation models suggest that the Pleistocene environment of Beringia was colder than at the present with broadly similar wind patterns and… Expand
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