Status Seekers: Chinese and Russian Responses to U.S. Primacy

@article{Larson2010StatusSC,
  title={Status Seekers: Chinese and Russian Responses to U.S. Primacy},
  author={Deborah Welch Larson and Alexei Shevchenko},
  journal={International Security},
  year={2010},
  volume={34},
  pages={63-95}
}
The United States needs support from other states to carry out global governance, particularly from rising powers such as China and Russia. Securing cooperation from China and Russia poses special problems, however, because neither state is part of the liberal Western community, ruling out appeals to common values and norms. Nevertheless, an alternative approach that is rooted in appreciation of China's and Russia's heightened status concerns may be viable. Since the end of the Cold War… Expand
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