Statistical Learning by 8-Month-Old Infants

@article{Saffran1996StatisticalLB,
  title={Statistical Learning by 8-Month-Old Infants},
  author={Jenny R. Saffran and Richard N. Aslin and Elissa L. Newport},
  journal={Science},
  year={1996},
  volume={274},
  pages={1926 - 1928}
}
Learners rely on a combination of experience-independent and experience-dependent mechanisms to extract information from the environment. Language acquisition involves both types of mechanisms, but most theorists emphasize the relative importance of experience-independent mechanisms. The present study shows that a fundamental task of language acquisition, segmentation of words from fluent speech, can be accomplished by 8-month-old infants based solely on the statistical relationships between… Expand
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