Statistical Analysis of the Hirsch Index

@article{Pratelli2011StatisticalAO,
  title={Statistical Analysis of the Hirsch Index},
  author={Luca Pratelli and Alberto Baccini and Lucio Barabesi and Marzia Marcheselli},
  journal={Scandinavian Journal of Statistics},
  year={2011},
  volume={39}
}
Abstract.  The Hirsch index (commonly referred to as h‐index) is a bibliometric indicator which is widely recognized as effective for measuring the scientific production of a scholar since it summarizes size and impact of the research output. In a formal setting, the h‐index is actually an empirical functional of the distribution of the citation counts received by the scholar. Under this approach, the asymptotic theory for the empirical h‐index has been recently exploited when the citation… 
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