Statin-induced apoptosis and skeletal myopathy.

@article{Dirks2006StatininducedAA,
  title={Statin-induced apoptosis and skeletal myopathy.},
  author={Amie J. Dirks and Kimberly Marie Jones},
  journal={American journal of physiology. Cell physiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={291 6},
  pages={
          C1208-12
        }
}
  • A. Dirks, K. Jones
  • Published 1 December 2006
  • Medicine
  • American journal of physiology. Cell physiology
Over 100 million prescriptions were filled for statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) in 2004. Statins were originally developed to lower plasma cholesterol in patients with hypercholesterolemia and are the most effective drugs on the market in doing so. Because of the discovered pleiotropic effects of statins, the use has expanded to the treatment of many other conditions, including ventricular arrythmias, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, cancer, osteoporosis… 

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  • Medicine, Biology
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A clinical management algorithm is presented which outlines a variety of co-morbidities which can potentiate the adverse effects of statins on muscle and a rational approach to the selection of those patients most likely to benefit from skeletal muscle biopsy is discussed.
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The results from this study suggest that exercise (Nov, Acct) does not exacerbate statin-induced myopathy in ApoE-/- mice, yet statin treatment reduces activity in a manner that prevents muscle from mounting a beneficial adaptive response to training.
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