Static Dental Disparity and Morphological Turnover in Sharks across the End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction

@article{Bazzi2018StaticDD,
  title={Static Dental Disparity and Morphological Turnover in Sharks across the End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction},
  author={Mohamad Bazzi and Benjamin P. Kear and Henning Blom and Per Erik Ahlberg and Nicol{\'a}s E. Campione},
  journal={Current biology : CB},
  year={2018},
  volume={28 16},
  pages={
          2607-2615.e3
        }
}

Figures from this paper

The extinction and survival of sharks across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction

The results show that selachimorphs maintained virtually static levels of dental disparity in most of their constituent clades during the Cretaceous/Paleogene transition, while some lamniform lineages experienced morphological depletion, others underwent a post-extinction disparity increase.

Tooth morphology elucidates shark evolution across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction

The results show that selachimorphs maintained virtually static levels of dental disparity in most of their constituent clades across the Cretaceous–Paleogene interval, and selective extinctions did impact apex predator species characterized by triangular blade-like teeth.

Evolution, diversity, and disparity of the tiger shark lineage Galeocerdo in deep time

It is demonstrated that the combined approach of quantitative geometric morphometric techniques and qualitative morphological comparisons on isolated shark teeth provides a useful tool to distinguish between species with highly similar tooth morphologies.

Feeding ecology has shaped the evolution of modern sharks

Size-driven preservational and macroecological biases in the latest Maastrichtian terrestrial vertebrate assemblages of North America

Abstract. The end-Cretaceous (K/Pg) mass extinction event is the most recent and well-understood of the “big five” and triggered establishment of modern terrestrial ecosystem structure. Despite the

Two-step extinction of Late Cretaceous marine vertebrates in northern Gulf of Mexico prolonged biodiversity loss prior to the Chicxulub impact

This stepwise pattern including the Middle Campanian and end-Maastrichtian events for, at least, a 13 million-year interval indicates long-term global marine environmental changes (e.g., regression, ocean water chemistry change).

Species richness and disparity of parareptiles across the end-Permian mass extinction

This study investigates both the species richness and morphological diversity (disparity) of parareptiles over the course of their history and examines the observations in the context of other metazoan clades, in order to identify post-extinction survivorship patterns that are present in the Parareptilia clade.

Climate cooling and clade competition likely drove the decline of lamniform sharks

It is found that the diversity dynamics of lamniforms waxed and waned following repeated cycles of radiation phases and declining phases, implying that the interplay between abiotic and biotic drivers had a substantial role in extinction and speciation, respectively.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 65 REFERENCES

Explosive morphological diversification of spiny-finned teleost fishes in the aftermath of the end-Cretaceous extinction

  • M. Friedman
  • Environmental Science, Geography
    Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2010
The trajectory of morphological diversification in this major radiation from its first appearance in the Late Cretaceous to the Miocene is reconstructed using a geometric morphometric database comprising more than 600 extinct species known from complete body fossils to suggest that multiple factors contributed to the prolific anatomical radiation of acanthomorphs.

Ecological impact of the end-Cretaceous extinction on lamniform sharks

It is shown, using novel morphometric analyses of fossil shark teeth, that the end-Cretaceous extinction of many sharks had major ecological consequences, and quantitative tooth morphometrics can distinguish lamniform sharks due to dietary differences, providing critical insights into ecological consequences of past extinction episodes.

New Age of Fishes initiated by the Cretaceous−Paleogene mass extinction

Significance Ray-finned fishes are the most diverse and ecologically dominant group of vertebrates on the planet. Previous molecular phylogenies and paleontological studies have shown that modern

Therian mammals experience an ecomorphological radiation during the Late Cretaceous and selective extinction at the K–Pg boundary

The conflicting diversity and disparity patterns suggest that earliest Palaeocene extinction survivors, especially eutherian dietary generalists, underwent rapid taxonomic diversification without considerable morphological diversification.

The Cretaceous-Tertiary biotic transition

Mass extinctions are recognized through the study of fossil groups across event horizons, and from analyses of long-term trends in taxonomic richness and diversity. Both approaches have inherent

The first 50 Myr of dinosaur evolution: macroevolutionary pattern and morphological disparity

Different aspects of the dinosaur radiation (diversity, disparity and abundance) were decoupled, and the overall macroevolutionary pattern of the first 50 Myr of dinosaur evolution is more complex than often considered.

Decoupling of morphological disparity and taxic diversity during the adaptive radiation of anomodont therapsids

The results highlight three main aspects of adaptive radiations: diversity and disparity are generally decoupled; models of radiations following mass extinctions may differ from those triggered by other causes (e.g. trait acquisition); and the bottleneck caused by a mass extinction means that a clade can emerge lacking its original potential for generating morphological variety.

Mammals across the K/Pg boundary in northeastern Montana, U.S.A.: dental morphology and body-size patterns reveal extinction selectivity and immigrant-fueled ecospace filling

  • G. Wilson
  • Environmental Science, Geography
    Paleobiology
  • 2013
The decline in dental-shape disparity and body-size disparity across the K/Pg boundary shows a pattern of constructive extinction selectivity against larger-bodied dietary specialists, particularly strict carnivores and taxa with plant-based diets, that suggests the kill mechanism was related to depressed primary productivity rather than a globally instantaneous event.

Diversification trajectories and evolutionary life-history traits in early sharks and batoids

Early Jurassic expansion of neoselachians was opportunistic in the aftermath of the end-Triassic mass extinction and the reasons for their rapid diversification and radiation probably include small body size, short lifespans and oviparity, enabling faster ecological reorganizations and innovations in body plans for adapting to changing environmental conditions.

Ecomorphological selectivity among marine teleost fishes during the end-Cretaceous extinction

  • M. Friedman
  • Environmental Science, Geography
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2009
Ecomorphological selectivity among marine teleost fishes during the end-Cretaceous extinction is demonstrated, based on a genus-level dataset that accounts for lineages predicted on the basis of phylogeny but not yet sampled in the fossil record.
...