State surveillance of protest and the rights to privacy and freedom of assembly: a comparison of judicial and protester perspectives

@article{Aston2017StateSO,
  title={State surveillance of protest and the rights to privacy and freedom of assembly: a comparison of judicial and protester perspectives},
  author={Valerie Aston},
  journal={European Journal of Law and Technology},
  year={2017},
  volume={8}
}
This paper considers the approach taken by the UK courts to the use of visible, overt police surveillance tactics in the context of political assemblies. Contrasting judicial attitudes to the direct experiences of protesters themselves, the paper argues that the narrow approach taken by the courts to questions of privacy, based on informational autonomy and the 'reasonable expectation of privacy' test, has led to the insufficient recognition of the psychological, social and political harms… CONTINUE READING

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