State Medicaid Expansions and Mortality, Revisited: A Cost-Benefit Analysis

@article{Sommers2017StateME,
  title={State Medicaid Expansions and Mortality, Revisited: A Cost-Benefit Analysis},
  author={Benjamin D. Sommers},
  journal={American Journal of Health Economics},
  year={2017},
  volume={3},
  pages={392-421}
}
  • B. Sommers
  • Published 1 July 2017
  • Economics
  • American Journal of Health Economics
Previous research found that Medicaid expansions in New York, Arizona, and Maine in the early 2000s reduced mortality. I revisit this question with improved data and methods, exploring distinct causes of death and presenting a cost-benefit analysis. Differences-in-differences analysis using a propensity score control group shows that all-cause mortality declined by 6 percent, with the most robust reductions for health-care amenable causes. HIV-related mortality (affected by the recent… 

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