Starch breakdown: recent discoveries suggest distinct pathways and novel mechanisms.

@article{Zeeman2007StarchBR,
  title={Starch breakdown: recent discoveries suggest distinct pathways and novel mechanisms.},
  author={S. Zeeman and T. Delatte and G. Messerli and Martin Umhang and M. Stettler and T. Mettler and S. Streb and H. Reinhold and O. K{\"o}tting},
  journal={Functional plant biology : FPB},
  year={2007},
  volume={34 6},
  pages={
          465-473
        }
}
The aim of this article is to provide an overview of current models of starch breakdown in leaves. We summarise the results of our recent work focusing on Arabidopsis, relating them to other work in the field. Early biochemical studies of starch containing tissues identified numerous enzymes capable of participating in starch degradation. In the non-living endosperms of germinated cereal seeds, starch breakdown proceeds by the combined actions of α-amylase, limit dextrinase (debranching enzyme… Expand
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