Star spangled manner: astrocytes and neurons contribute to adenosine release in the hippocampus.

Abstract

Neurons in the brain signal to each other by the release of chemical neurotransmitters. These are concentrated in vesicles at the presynaptic terminal and following a calcium influx the vesicles release the transmitter to act at postsynaptic receptors. In this respect adenosine is unusual, as it can be released from presynaptic vesicles, but an increase in extracellular adenosine may also result from other mechanisms. Adenosine produced in a cell can efflux passively by membrane transport proteins called equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) and extracellular adenosine can be produced from the hydrolysis of ATP by extracellularly localised enzymes called ectonucleotidases. To further complicate matters, ATP itself can be released from cells by vesicular release or through membrane channels formed of connexin. Understanding the mechanisms and function of adenosine in the brain is, therefore of great interest due to its widespread presence and diverse roles as a modulatory neurotransmitter. A major action of adenosine is the inhibition

DOI: 10.1113/jphysiol.2013.259838

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Cite this paper

@article{Parri2013StarSM, title={Star spangled manner: astrocytes and neurons contribute to adenosine release in the hippocampus.}, author={H Rheinallt Parri}, journal={The Journal of physiology}, year={2013}, volume={591 16}, pages={3805-6} }