Staphylococcal Enterocolitis: Forgotten but Not Gone?

@article{Lin2009StaphylococcalEF,
  title={Staphylococcal Enterocolitis: Forgotten but Not Gone?},
  author={Zheng-lun Lin and Donald P. Kotler and Patrick M. Schlievert and Emilia Mia Sordillo},
  journal={Digestive Diseases and Sciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={55},
  pages={1200-1207}
}
PurposeStaphylococcus aureus may cause antibiotic-associated diarrhea and enterocolitis, with or without preceding antibiotic use, in immunocompromised adults or infants, or individuals with predisposing conditions, but there is little appreciation of this condition clinically.Clinical DiseaseThe main clinical feature that helps to differentiate staphylococcal enterocolitis (SEC) from Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is large-volume, cholera-like diarrhea in the former case. A… Expand
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