Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

@article{Amor2014StandingwaveexcitedMF,
  title={Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells},
  author={Rumelo Amor and Sumeet Mahajan and William B. Amos and Gail McConnell},
  journal={Scientific Reports},
  year={2014},
  volume={4}
}
Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane… 

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