Standards for epidemiologic studies and surveillance of epilepsy

@article{Thurman2011StandardsFE,
  title={Standards for epidemiologic studies and surveillance of epilepsy},
  author={D. Thurman and E. Beghi and C. Begley and A. Berg and J. Buchhalter and D. Ding and D. Hesdorffer and W. Hauser and L. Kazis and R. Kobau and B. Kroner and D. Labiner and K. Liow and G. Logroscino and M. T. Medina and C. Newton and K. Parko and A. Paschal and P. Preux and Josemir W Sander and A. Selassie and W. Theodore and T. Tomson and S. Wiebe},
  journal={Epilepsia},
  year={2011},
  volume={52}
}
Worldwide, about 65 million people are estimated to have epilepsy. Epidemiologic studies are necessary to define the full public health burden of epilepsy; to set public health and health care priorities; to provide information needed for prevention, early detection, and treatment; to identify education and service needs; and to promote effective health care and support programs for people with epilepsy. However, different definitions and epidemiologic methods complicate the tasks of these… Expand
Surveillance of epilepsy and prevention of epilepsy and its sequelae: lessons from the Institute of Medicine report.
TLDR
Future epilepsy surveillance should track incidence and prevalence over time, access to epilepsy care, direct and indirect costs, and the cost-effectiveness of treatment. Expand
CDC-supported epilepsy surveillance and epidemiologic studies: A review of progress since 1994
To report progress, to identify gaps, and to plan epilepsy surveillance and research activities more effectively, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Epilepsy Program has summarizedExpand
Epilepsy in adults and access to care--United States, 2010.
TLDR
To determine epilepsy prevalence among adults, assess their access to care, and provide baseline estimates for a Healthy People 2020 objective, CDC analyzed data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey. Expand
Epidemiology of epilepsy.
TLDR
These advanced epidemiologic methods are expected to yield a better understanding of diverse risk factors, high-risk populations, seizure triggers, multiple and poorly understood causes of epilepsy, and establish the natural course of treated and untreated epilepsy and syndromes. Expand
Prevalence and incidence of epilepsy in the Nordic countries.
TLDR
It is estimated that approximately 0.6% of the population of the Nordic countries have active epilepsy, i.e. approximately 30,000 persons in Norway, one of the most common neurological disorders. Expand
Incidence and Prevalence of Childhood Epilepsy: A Nationwide Cohort Study
TLDR
About 1 out of 150 children is diagnosed with epilepsy during the first 10 years of life, with the highest incidence rate observed during infancy, in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Expand
Validation of healthcare administrative data for the diagnosis of epilepsy
TLDR
A diagnostic algorithm including EEG and selected treatment schedules is only moderately sensitive for the detection of epilepsy and seizures. Expand
Prevalence and incidence of epilepsy
TLDR
This study provides a comprehensive synthesis of the prevalence and incidence of epilepsy from published international studies and offers insight into factors that contribute to heterogeneity between estimates. Expand
Epidemiology of Epilepsy in Korea
TLDR
Only a few epidemiological studies of epilepsy have been conducted in Korea, and those studies and related issues regarding epidemiological research on epilepsy are discussed. Expand
Definition, Classification, and Burden of Epilepsy
Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases in the world, and is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures (fits) that can occur at all ages. The causes of epilepsy are multiple,Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 227 REFERENCES
Recent developments in the epidemiology of epilepsy
  • W. Hauser
  • Medicine
  • Acta neurologica Scandinavica. Supplementum
  • 1995
TLDR
Although a number of factors are often identified as causes of epilepsy, studies have identified a definitive aetiology in only one‐third of all newly diagnosed cases, epidemiological studies have confirmed the importance of postnatal insults and quantified the risk. Expand
Guidelines for Epidemiologic Studies on Epilepsy
TLDR
The proposed guidelines represent a consensus between epileptologists and epidemiologists and are presented in four parts: Definition of seizures and epilepsy, (b) seizure type classification, (c) risk factors; and (d) recommended measurement indexes. Expand
The epidemiology of epilepsy revisited
TLDR
There is geographic variation in the incidence of epileptic syndromes likely to be associated with genetic and environmental factors, although as yet causality has not been fully established. Expand
Understanding the burden of epilepsy in Latin America: A systematic review of its prevalence and incidence
TLDR
This systematic review of epidemiological studies identifies higher prevalence and incidence rates of epilepsy in the general population of Latin America than in northern hemisphere countries. Expand
Burden of epilepsy: the Ontario Health Survey.
TLDR
In the general population, self-identification as having epilepsy carries a significant burden of illness, reflected in poorer health, psychosocial function, and quality of life, and higher health care resource use, which is similar to that obtained in studies involving defined epilepsy patients. Expand
Epilepsy in North America: A Report Prepared under the Auspices of the Global Campaign against Epilepsy, the International Bureau for Epilepsy, the International League Against Epilepsy, and the World Health Organization
TLDR
A Plan for Epilepsy in North America should address basic and clinical research; primary prevention research; translation to care; stigma, quality of life, and self‐management; industry relations; government and regional relations; and regional integration and resource sharing. Expand
Methodologic Issues in Studies of Mortality Following Epilepsy: Measures, Types of Studies, Sources of Cases, Cohort Effects, and Competing Risks
TLDR
It is concluded that the gold standard for studies on mortality should be a population‐based cohort of incident cases, because this type of cohort permits a complete collection of data and the observation of the clinical phase of the disease from the diagnosis of epilepsy to the outcome of the study, death. Expand
Epidemiology, aetiology, and clinical management of epilepsy in Asia: a systematic review
TLDR
An understanding of the psychosocial, cultural, economic, organisational, and political factors influencing epilepsy causation, management, and outcome should be of high priority for future investigations. Expand
Differences in the use of health services among people with and without epilepsy in the United Kingdom: socio-economic and disease-specific determinants
TLDR
Older age and low social class were less strongly associated with health service utilisation than in people without epilepsy, indicating that people with epilepsy lose much of the protective effect of young age and high social class on health. Expand
Racial/ethnic disparities in the treatment of epilepsy: What do we know? What do we need to know?
TLDR
An online literature search using several keywords (race, ethnicity, epilepsy, treatment, and quality of life) and identified additional literature through cross-referencing/manual search suggested underutilization of state-of-the-art therapies by minorities. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...