Standard back-translation procedures may not capture proper emotion concepts: a case study of Chinese disgust terms.

Abstract

We present data questioning the adequacy of standard back-translation procedures for investigating emotion states across cultures (Brislin, 1970). Our data indicate that the Chinese back-translation of the term disgust has led cross-cultural researchers to accept terms whose themes, goals, and motivations are more akin to the English term anger. Evidence is presented showing that, compared with the standard back-translation method, a more painstaking interview method found a better translational Chinese equivalent for the English term disgust. Implications for the use of back-translation in cross-cultural research are considered.

DOI: 10.1037/a0021453

Cite this paper

@article{Barger2010StandardBP, title={Standard back-translation procedures may not capture proper emotion concepts: a case study of Chinese disgust terms.}, author={Brian Barger and Robin L. Nabi and Liang Hong}, journal={Emotion}, year={2010}, volume={10 5}, pages={703-11} }