Staggering gait in medical history

@article{Schiller1995StaggeringGI,
  title={Staggering gait in medical history},
  author={F. Schiller},
  journal={Annals of Neurology},
  year={1995},
  volume={37}
}
  • F. Schiller
  • Published 1995
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Annals of Neurology
  • Drunkenness and senility were recognized early as the basis of a staggering gait. To these were added venereal excesses, hence syphilis. Medical and scientific concerns began to be focused on “locomotor ataxia” in the 19th century with the systematic development of neuroanatomy and physiology. Rolando and Flourens were followed by Romberg and Todd, and later Friedreich, who all gave the spinal cord temporal precedence as a culprit over the cerebellum–and there were some forerunners. New spinal… CONTINUE READING
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