Stable room-temperature molecular negative differential resistance based on molecule-electrode interface chemistry.

Abstract

We show reproducible, stable negative differential resistance (NDR) at room temperature in molecule-controlled, solvent-free devices, based on reversible changes in molecule-electrode interface properties. The active component is the cyclic disulfide end of a series of molecules adsorbed onto mercury. As this active component is reduced, the Hg-molecule contact is broken, and an insulating barrier at the molecule-electrode interface is formed. Therefore, the alignment of the molecular energy levels, relative to the Fermi levels of the electrodes, is changed. This effect results in a decrease in the current with voltage increase as the reduction process progresses, leading to the so-called NDR behavior. The effect is reproducible and repeatable over more than 50 scans without any reduction in the current. The stability of the system, which is in the "solid state" except for the Hg, is due to the molecular design where long alkyl chains keep the molecules aligned with respect to the Hg electrode, even when they are not bound to it any longer.

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Cite this paper

@article{Salomon2004StableRM, title={Stable room-temperature molecular negative differential resistance based on molecule-electrode interface chemistry.}, author={Adi Salomon and Rina Arad-Yellin and Abraham Shanzer and Amir Karton and David Cahen}, journal={Journal of the American Chemical Society}, year={2004}, volume={126 37}, pages={11648-57} }