Stable replication of plasmids derived from Epstein–Barr virus in various mammalian cells

@article{Yates1985StableRO,
  title={Stable replication of plasmids derived from Epstein–Barr virus in various mammalian cells},
  author={John L. Yates and Noreen Warren and Bill Sugden},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1985},
  volume={313},
  pages={812-815}
}
Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infects human B lymphocytes, transforming the infected cells into dividing blasts that can proliferate indefinitely (see ref. 1 for a review). The viral genome of 172 kilobase pairs (kbp) is a plasmid in most transformed cells2–4. We have identified a region of EBV DNA, termed oriP (nucleotides 7,333–9,109 of strain B95–8), which acts in cis to permit linked DNAs to replicate as plasmids in cells containing EBV DNA5. We have postulated the existence of a trans-acting… Expand
Replication of plasmids derived from bovine papilloma virus type 1 and Epstein-Barr virus in cells in culture.
The major components encoded by BPV-1 and EBV that act in plasmid replication of these viral DNAs in latently infected cells are now known. The minimal DNA sequences required in cis have beenExpand
Viral Plasmids in Mammalian Cells
TLDR
This chapter focuses on the genomes of Epstein-Barr virus, the related Kaposi's sarcoma-associated (virus human herpesvirus 8), and papillomavirus, which can persist indefinitely in latently infected cells due to their ability to replicate and stably segregate during cell division. Expand
Reducing the complexity of the transforming Epstein-Barr virus genome to 64 kilobase pairs
TLDR
These experiments reduce the complexity of the EBV DNA necessary for transformation of primary B lymphocytes to 64 kbp, which should be useful for molecular genetic analyses of transforming EBV genes or for the insertion of heterologous fragments into transformingEBV genomes. Expand
Mapping genetic elements of Epstein-Barr virus that facilitate extrachromosomal persistence of Epstein-Barr virus-derived plasmids in human cells
The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome becomes established as a multicopy plasmid in the nucleus of infected B lymphocytes. A cis-acting DNA sequence previously described within the BamHI-C fragment ofExpand
DNA:EBMA-1 Interactions and Latency of Epstein-Barr Virus
TLDR
EBNA-1 is the only viral protein required, in addition to the cellular replication machinery, to replicate the episomal form of the EBV genome. Expand
Stable episomal maintenance of yeast artificial chromosomes in human cells
TLDR
Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated a close association of OriPYACs, some of which were visible as pairs, with host cell chromosomes, suggesting that the episomes replicate once per cell cycle and that stability is achieved by attachment to host chromosomes, as suggested for the viral genome. Expand
The Minimal Replicator of Epstein-Barr VirusoriP
TLDR
It is found that plasmids carryingoriP required EBNA-1 to replicate efficiently even when assayed only 2 days afterplasmids were introduced into the cell lines 143B and 293, and its minimal active core appears to be simply two properly spaced EB NA-1 binding sites. Expand
Epstein-Barr virus-based vectors that replicate in rodent cells.
TLDR
The addition of large fragments of mammalian DNA to vectors containing the EBNA-1 gene and the family of repeats from EBV generates autonomously replicating vectors which are stably maintained as extrachromosomal plasmids in hamster cells, which represent the only available class of stable, autonomous vectors replicating once per cell cycle. Expand
Expression of the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 2 in rodent cells
TLDR
A 1.5 kilobase open reading frame within this DNA segment has now been inserted into a murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-derived expression vector (pZIP-NEO-SV(X)1) which provides for transcription of heterologous DNA but not for translational start. Expand
Genetic Evidence that EBNA-1 Is Needed for Efficient, Stable Latent Infection by Epstein-Barr Virus
TLDR
The data indicate that EBNA-1 is required for efficient and stable latent infection by EBV under the conditions tested, and indicates that autonomous maintenance of the EBV chromosome during latent infection does not depend on the replication initiation function of oriP. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 26 REFERENCES
A cis-acting element from the Epstein-Barr viral genome that permits stable replication of recombinant plasmids in latently infected cells.
TLDR
A cis-acting element within 1.8 kbp of the viral genome that allows recombinant plasmids carrying it to be selected at high frequency and maintained as plasmid in cells latently infected by EBV is identified. Expand
Separation of Epstein-Barr virus DNA from large chromosomal DNA in non-virus-producing cells.
TLDR
It is suggested that the EBV DNA in Raji cells is not covalently linked to the large chromosomal DNA, although the number of viral genomes per cell remains constant during passage, and that small fragments of cell DNA are bonded to the viral DNA. Expand
Chromosome site for Epstein-Barr virus DNA in a Burkitt tumor cell line and in lymphocytes growth-transformed in vitro.
TLDR
It is suggested that most or all of the EBV genome is integrated into the chromosomal DNA of Namalwa and IB4 cells, and a previously undescribed achromatic site is identified within the region of EBV chromosome cytological hybridization. Expand
Epstein-Barr virus DNA is amplified in transformed lymphocytes
TLDR
Leukocytes isolated from two adult donors who lacked detectable antibodies to antigens associated with Epstein-Barr virus were exposed to an average of 0.02 to 0.1 DNA-containing particles of EB virus per cell and immediately clones in agarose, indicating that Epstein- Barr virus DNA can undergo amplification relative to cell DNA at different times after it transforms cells. Expand
Simple repeat sequence in Epstein-Barr virus DNA is transcribed in latent and productive infections
TLDR
The nucleotide sequence of a 1,153-base pair HinfI fragment in BamHI fragment K from the B95-8 Epstein-Barr virus isolate, designated IR3, is determined, which is composed of only three nucleotide triplet elements: GGG, GCA, and GGA. Expand
Stable expression in mouse cells of nuclear neoantigen after transfer of a 3.4-megadalton cloned fragment of Epstein-Barr virus DNA.
TLDR
Mouse cells expressing EBNA as the result of acquisition of cloned EBV DNA fragments should prove useful in the characterization of the structure of this antigen and as reagents for the diagnosis of EBV infections. Expand
Identification of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen polypeptide in mouse and monkey cells after gene transfer with a cloned 2.9-kilobase-pair subfragment of the genome.
TLDR
EBNA in human lymphoid cells bearing a complete I1f fragment as part of the entire EBV genome is the same size (Mr, 78,000) as EBNA found after gene transfer of I 1f alone into mouse or monkey cells, indicating that EBNA is encoded by viral genes. Expand
Epstein-Barr virus RNA VII: size and direction of transcription of virus-specified cytoplasmic RNAs in a transformed cell line.
At least three separate regions of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome encode RNA in a cell line that is growth transformed and nonpermissively infected with EBV. Six polyadenylylated cytoplasmicExpand
Direct transfer of cloned genes from bacteria to mammalian cells.
  • W. Schaffner
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1980
TLDR
Experiments with other cell lines of human, monkey, and mouse origin, and also with bacteria harboring another recombinant plasmid, indicate that DNA transfer from bacteria to mammalian cells is a general phenomenon. Expand
Covalently closed circular duplex DNA of Epstein-Barr virus in a human lymphoid cell line.
TLDR
A non-integrated form of Epstein-Barr virus DNA was purified from the Burkitt lymphoma-derived human lymphoid cell line Raji by CsCl density gradient centrifugation and neutral glycerol gradient centrifugalation, confirming the covalently closed circular duplex structure of part of the intracellular viral DNA. Expand
...
1
2
3
...