Stabilization of the arrival time of a relativistic electron beam to the 50 fs level

@article{Roberts2018StabilizationOT,
  title={Stabilization of the arrival time of a relativistic electron beam to the 50 fs level},
  author={J. B. Roberts and Piotr Krzysztof Skowronski and Philip Nicholas Burrows and Glenn Christian and Roberto Corsini and Andrea Ghigo and Fabio Marcellini and Colin Perry},
  journal={Physical review accelerators and beams},
  year={2018},
  volume={21},
  pages={011001}
}
We report the results of a low-latency beam phase feed-forward system built to stabilise the arrival time of a relativistic electron beam. The system was operated at the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN where the beam arrival time was stabilised to approximately 50~fs. The system latency was \(350\)~ns and the correction bandwidth \(>23\)~MHz. The system meets the requirements for CLIC. 

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