Stability of African pastoral ecosystems: alternate paradigms and implications for development

@article{Ellis1988StabilityOA,
  title={Stability of African pastoral ecosystems: alternate paradigms and implications for development},
  author={James E. Ellis and David M. Swift},
  journal={Journal of Range Management},
  year={1988},
  volume={41},
  pages={450-459}
}
  • J. Ellis, D. Swift
  • Published 1 November 1988
  • Environmental Science
  • Journal of Range Management
JIM ELLIS took undergraduate work in animal husbandry at the University of Missouri and also obtained his Master of Science degree there studying wildlife biology. In 1970, he received his Ph.D. in Zoology at the University of California at Davis, where he was a National Institute of Health trainee in systems ecology. Shortly thereafter, he held a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Bristol working on systems analysis of mammalian social systems. He joined… 

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