Stability Parameters for Comparing Varieties

@article{Eberhart1966StabilityPF,
  title={Stability Parameters for Comparing Varieties},
  author={Steve A. Eberhart and W. A. Russell},
  journal={Crop Science},
  year={1966},
  volume={6},
  pages={36-40}
}
The model, Yij = μ1 + β1Ij + δij, defines stability parameters that may be used to describe the performance of a variety over a series of environments. Yij is the variety mean of the ith variety at the jth environment, µ1 is the ith variety mean over all environments, β1 is the regression coefficient that measures the response of the ith variety to varying environments, δij is the deviation from regression of the ith variety at the jth environment, and Ij is the environmental index. The data… 

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