Spurious? Name Similarity Effects (Implicit Egotism) in Marriage, Job and Moving Decisions

@article{Simonsohn2011SpuriousNS,
  title={Spurious? Name Similarity Effects (Implicit Egotism) in Marriage, Job and Moving Decisions},
  author={Uri Simonsohn},
  journal={BHNP: History of Management Theory \& Practice (Topic)},
  year={2011}
}
  • U. Simonsohn
  • Published 16 June 2010
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • BHNP: History of Management Theory & Practice (Topic)
Three articles published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology have shown that a disproportionate share of people choose spouses, places to live, and occupations with names similar to their own. These findings, interpreted as evidence of implicit egotism, are included in most modern social psychology textbooks and many university courses. The current article successfully replicates the original findings but shows that they are most likely caused by a combination of cohort… Expand
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The surprising potency of implicit egotism: A reply to Simonsohn.
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It is argued that Simonsohn provides no compelling theoretical reason to believe that implicit egotism should be valid only in the laboratory, and it is concluded that it is more constructive to try to identify theoretically derived moderators of implicit Egotism than to tries to document thatIt is always spurious in the field. Expand
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Identity Selection and the Social Construction of Birthdays
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References

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TLDR
The evidence for the most systematic test of the notion that major life decisions are influenced by name-similarity is revisited, whereby the documented effect seems to be driven by people naming companies they start after themselves rather than by employees seeking out companies they have a shared initial with. Expand
Assessing the validity of implicit egotism: a reply to Gallucci (2003).
TLDR
In support of implicit egotism, Pelham et al presented evidence from 10 archival studies showing that people gravitate toward careers and places of residence that resemble their names or birthday numbers, including exhaustive studies of common surnames and US city names and common surname and street names. Expand
How do I love thee? Let me count the Js: implicit egotism and interpersonal attraction.
TLDR
It is shown that people are disproportionately likely to marry others whose first or last names resemble their own, and that participants were more attracted to people whose arbitrary experimental code numbers resembled their own birthday numbers. Expand
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People gravitate toward people, places, and things that resemble the self. We refer to this tendency as implicit egotism, and we suggest that it reflects an unconscious process that is grounded inExpand
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Japanese studies have repeatedly failed to obtain any explicit tendency to enhance self-esteem. In two studies, the authors attempted an implicit assessment of positive feelings attached to JapaneseExpand
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TLDR
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  • Psychology, Medicine
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TLDR
New analyses of the original data are reported, showing that the hypothesis that people gravitate toward cities, states, and careers with names similar to their own names is not supported for the large majority of names considered, and for some names even the opposite result is found. Expand
In the "I" of the storm: Shared initials increase disaster donations
People prefer their own initials to other letters, influencing preferences in many domains. The ``name letter effect'' (Nuttin, 1987) may not apply to negatively valenced targets if people areExpand
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