Spurious Also?

@article{Simonsohn2011SpuriousA,
  title={Spurious Also?},
  author={Uri Simonsohn},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={22},
  pages={1087 - 1089}
}
  • U. Simonsohn
  • Published 1 August 2011
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Psychological Science
Implicit egotism is the notion that major life decisions are influenced by name-similarity. This paper revisits the evidence for the most systematic test of this hypothesis. Anseel & Duyck (2008) analyzed data from 1/3 of all Belgian employees and found that a disproportionate fraction of them shared their initial with their employer. Using a dataset with American employees I replicate the finding, but new analyses strongly suggest they are due to reverse causality, whereby the documented… Expand
Spurious? Name Similarity Effects (Implicit Egotism) in Marriage, Job and Moving Decisions
  • U. Simonsohn
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of personality and social psychology
  • 2011
TLDR
Findings that a disproportionate share of people choose spouses, places to live, and occupations with names similar to their own are found to be caused by a combination of cohort, geographic, and ethnic confounds as well as reverse causality. Expand
When Tex and Tess Carpenter Build Houses in Texas: Moderators of Implicit Egotism
Implicit egotism is an unconscious preference for things resembling the self. Four studies provided unprecedented evidence for implicit egotism. Study 1 used census data to show that menExpand
In press at the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology Total length: 5 pages, double-spaced. IN DEFENSE OF DILIGENCE: A REJOINDER TO PELHAM AND CARVALLO
In Simonsohn (2011) I report the results from 14 studies that suggest all existing evidence of implicit egotism in marriage, job and location decisions is spurious. Lack of diligence by Pelham andExpand
Names and behavior in a war
We implement a novel empirical strategy for measuring and studying a strong form of nationalism—the willingness to fight and die in a war for national independence—using name choices corresponding toExpand
What’s in a Name: A Bayesian Hierarchical Analysis of the Name-Letter Effect
TLDR
This paper re-analyzes two data sets that address the question of whether people are disproportionately likely to live in cities that resemble their name and outlines a Bayesian hierarchical analysis that avoids limitations and allows coherent inference. Expand
What’s really in a Name-Letter Effect? Name-letter preferences as indirect measures of self-esteem
People show a preference for the letters occurring in their name (Name-Letter Effect), a phenomenon that has inspired the development of a frequently used indirect measure of self-esteem. ThisExpand
The Name-Letter-Effect in Groups: Sharing Initials with Group Members Increases the Quality of Group Work
TLDR
It is suggested that sharing initials with other group members promotes positive feelings toward those group members that in turn affect group outcomes, and demonstrates how minimal a degree of similarity among members is sufficient to influence quality of group outcomes. Expand
Name Similarity Encourages Generosity: A Field Experiment in Email Personalization
TLDR
The results suggest that uniting people with shared names is an effective individual-level approach to email personalization and discusses how using a person’s name in marketing communications may capture attention and bridge social distance. Expand
Parent–Child Proximity: Automatic Cognitions Matter
Individuals’ moving behavior (e.g., residential mobility) is an emerging topic in many scientific disciplines. One specific aspect is the distance between parents and their children (i.e.,Expand
Ahead of others in the authorship order: names with middle initials appear earlier in author lists of academic articles in psychology
TLDR
Investigation of whether middle initials are associated with a typical academic indicator of intellectual performance: authorship order of journal articles in psychology found middle initials in author names were overrepresented early (vs. late) in author lists. Expand
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References

SHOWING 1-6 OF 6 REFERENCES
Spurious? Name Similarity Effects (Implicit Egotism) in Marriage, Job and Moving Decisions
  • U. Simonsohn
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of personality and social psychology
  • 2011
TLDR
Findings that a disproportionate share of people choose spouses, places to live, and occupations with names similar to their own are found to be caused by a combination of cohort, geographic, and ethnic confounds as well as reverse causality. Expand
Unconscious Applicants: A Systematic Test of the Name-Letter Effect
TLDR
A large-scale study is conducted to investigate whether people whose names begin with a given letter have a tendency to work for companies with names that begin with the same letter, and whether job choice is a theoretically challenging case for the NLE. Expand
Implicit Egotism
People gravitate toward people, places, and things that resemble the self. We refer to this tendency as implicit egotism, and we suggest that it reflects an unconscious process that is grounded inExpand
Some Methods for Strengthening the Common χ 2 Tests
Since the x2 tests of goodness of fit and of association in contingency tables are presented in many courses on statistical methods for beginners in the subject, it is not surprising that x2 hasExpand
For my proposed method of controlling for language in the Belgian data, see the Supplemental Material available online
    The letters Q, X, Y, and Z combined had an expected frequency of only 17 same-letter matches and are therefore excluded from the figure