Sports-related chronic repetitive head trauma as a cause of pituitary dysfunction.

@article{Dubourg2011SportsrelatedCR,
  title={Sports-related chronic repetitive head trauma as a cause of pituitary dysfunction.},
  author={Julie Dubourg and Mahmoud Messerer},
  journal={Neurosurgical focus},
  year={2011},
  volume={31 5},
  pages={
          E2
        }
}
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is recognized as a cause of hypopituitarism even after mild TBI. Although over the past decade, a growing body of research has detailed neuroendocrine changes induced by TBI, the mechanisms and risk factors responsible for this pituitary dysfunction are still unclear. Around the world, sports-especially combative sports-are very popular. However, sports are not generally considered as a cause of TBI in most epidemiological studies, and the link between sports… 

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