Sport-Related Kidney Injury Among High School Athletes

@article{Grinsell2012SportRelatedKI,
  title={Sport-Related Kidney Injury Among High School Athletes},
  author={Matthew M. Grinsell and Kirsten Butz and Matthew J. Gurka and Kelly K. Gurka and Victoria F. Norwood},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2012},
  volume={130},
  pages={e40 - e45}
}
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a “qualified yes” for participation by athletes with single kidneys in contact/collision sports. Despite this recommendation, most physicians continue to discourage participation in contact/collision sports for patients with single kidneys. A major concern is the lack of prospective data quantifying the incidence of sport-related kidney injury. The objective was to quantify the incidence of sport-related kidney injury among… 

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