Spore diffusate isolated from some strains of Aspergillus fumigatus inhibits phagocytosis by murine alveolar macrophages.

Abstract

Aspergillus fumigatus is a ubiquitous fungus that grows in decaying organic matter. It can cause disease in both immunodeficient and immunocompetent patients by using virulence factors to escape the host defenses. Some of these factors, such as a diffusate, released from the spores of A. fumigatus, have previously been described. This diffusate was demonstrated to inhibit oxidative burst and phagocytosis of coated red blood cells. The present study has shown that this substance can inhibit the phagocytosis of A. fumigatus spores by murine alveolar macrophages (MALU) and evaluated the action of this substance. We quantified phagocytosis by MALU cells with and without diffusate and evaluated the inhibition of phagocytosis by testing diffusates from different strains. We conclude that the spore diffusate of some strains of A. fumigatus can reversibly decrease the ability of alveolar macrophages to ingest A. fumigatus spores.

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@article{Bertout2002SporeDI, title={Spore diffusate isolated from some strains of Aspergillus fumigatus inhibits phagocytosis by murine alveolar macrophages.}, author={S{\'e}bastien Bertout and Catherine Badoc and Mich{\`e}le Malli{\'e} and Jean Giaimis and J P Bastide}, journal={FEMS immunology and medical microbiology}, year={2002}, volume={33 2}, pages={101-6} }