Spontaneous use of sticks as tools by captive gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla)

@article{Nakamichi2007SpontaneousUO,
  title={Spontaneous use of sticks as tools by captive gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla)},
  author={Masayuki Nakamichi},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2007},
  volume={40},
  pages={487-498}
}
The present report describes the spontaneous use of sticks, as tools by young adult gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in a social group at the San Diego Wild Animal Park, CA, USA. Three 8-year-old gorillas (one female and two males) threw sticks into the foliage of trees, which the gorillas could not climb due to electric wire, to knock down leaves and seeds. Two of the three gorillas selected sticks that were more suitable (i.e. longer or thicker sticks) for throwing. Moreover, they looked up… Expand

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