Sponge meadows and glass ramps: State shifts and regime change

@article{Ritterbush2019SpongeMA,
  title={Sponge meadows and glass ramps: State shifts and regime change},
  author={Kathleen A. Ritterbush},
  journal={Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology},
  year={2019}
}
  • K. Ritterbush
  • Published 1 January 2019
  • Geography, Environmental Science
  • Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology

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