Sponge-feeding fishes of the West Indies

@article{Randall1968SpongefeedingFO,
  title={Sponge-feeding fishes of the West Indies},
  author={John E. Randall and Willard D. Hartman},
  journal={Marine Biology},
  year={1968},
  volume={1},
  pages={216-225}
}
In an analysis of the stomach contents of 212 species of West Indian reef and inshore fishes, sponge remains were found in 21 species. In eleven of these, sponges comprised 6% or more of the stomach contents; it is assumed that these fishes feed intentionally on sponges. Sponges comprise over 95% of the food of angelfishes of the genus Holacanthus, over 70% of the food of species of the related genus Pomacanthus, and more than 85% of the food of the filefish, Cantherhines macrocerus. Lesser… 
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