Sponge Paleogenomics Reveals an Ancient Role for Carbonic Anhydrase in Skeletogenesis

@article{Jackson2007SpongePR,
  title={Sponge Paleogenomics Reveals an Ancient Role for Carbonic Anhydrase in Skeletogenesis},
  author={D. Jackson and L. Macis and J. Reitner and B. Degnan and G. W{\"o}rheide},
  journal={Science},
  year={2007},
  volume={316},
  pages={1893 - 1895}
}
Sponges (phylum Porifera) were prolific reef-building organisms during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic ∼542 to 65 million years ago. These ancient animals inherited components of the first multicellular skeletogenic toolkit from the last common ancestor of the Metazoa. Using a paleogenomics approach, including gene- and protein-expression techniques and phylogenetic reconstruction, we show that a molecular component of this toolkit was the precursor to the α-carbonic anhydrases (α-CAs), a gene… Expand
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