Splitting the ciliary axoneme: implications for a "switch-point" model of dynein arm activity in ciliary motion.

Abstract

In the presence of specific inhibitors of beat. 20 microM VO4(3-) or pCa 4, mussel gill lateral (L) cilia can be arrested in two positions--"hands down" or "hands up"--at opposite ends of the stroke cycle. Cilia move to these positions by doublet microtubule sliding. Axonemes of arrested cilia, still tethered to the cell, are intact after demembranation and… (More)

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Cite this paper

@article{Satir1989SplittingTC, title={Splitting the ciliary axoneme: implications for a "switch-point" model of dynein arm activity in ciliary motion.}, author={Peter Satir and Toshiyasu Matsuoka}, journal={Cell motility and the cytoskeleton}, year={1989}, volume={14 3}, pages={345-58} }