Split Definitive: How Party Polarization Turned the Supreme Court into a Partisan Court

@article{Devins2017SplitDH,
  title={Split Definitive: How Party Polarization Turned the Supreme Court into a Partisan Court},
  author={Neal Devins and Lawrence Baum},
  journal={The Supreme Court Review},
  year={2017},
  volume={2016},
  pages={301 - 365}
}
Starting in 2010 the Supreme Court has divided into two partisan ideological blocs; all the Court’s Democratic appointees are liberal and all its Republicans are conservative. Correspondingly, since 1990 there has been a dramatic increase in the ideological gap between Democratic and Republican appointees. In this article we make use of original empirical research to establish that this partisan division is unprecedented in the Court’s history, and we undertake a systematic analysis of how it… 

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