Spitzer Transit Follow-up of Planet Candidates from the K2 Mission

@article{Livingston2019SpitzerTF,
  title={Spitzer Transit Follow-up of Planet Candidates from the K2 Mission},
  author={John H. Livingston and Ian J. M. Crossfield and Michael W. Werner and Varoujan Gorjian and Erik A. Petigura and David R. Ciardi and Courtney D. Dressing and Benjamin J. Fulton and Teruyuki Hirano and Joshua E. Schlieder and Evan J. Sinukoff and Molly R. Kosiarek and Rachel L. Akeson and Charles A. Beichman and Bj{\"o}rn Benneke and Jessie L. Christiansen and Brad Hansen and Andrew W. Howard and Howard T. Isaacson and Heather A. Knutson and Jessica E. Krick and Arturo O. Martinez and Bun’ei Sato and Motohide Tamura},
  journal={The Astronomical Journal},
  year={2019},
  volume={157}
}
We present precision 4.5 Spitzer transit photometry of eight planet candidates discovered by the K2 mission: K2-52 b, K2-53 b, EPIC 205084841.01, K2-289 b, K2-174 b, K2-87 b, K2-90 b, and K2-124 b. The sample includes four sub-Neptunes and two sub-Saturns, with radii between 2.6 and 18 and equilibrium temperatures between 440 and 2000 K. In this paper we identify several targets of potential interest for future characterization studies, demonstrate the utility of transit follow-up observations… 

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