Spirituality and practice. Stories, barriers and opportunities. Interview by Laurence A. Savett.

Abstract

What are "spiritual matters?" Are "spiritual matters" the same as "religious matters?" What is spiritual inquiry? Are such questions appropriate for those of us in the caring professions, other than clergy, to consider? If we accept that role, how far should we go? When should we call for help? Whom should we call? We convened a gathering of a hospital chaplain, a social worker, a hospice nurse and a physician to discuss many of the dimensions of spirituality and then to apply their personal and professional paradigms of care to a discussion of an actual case. This article is a record of that conversation. It is actually several articles in one, for it deals with their own views of the meaning of spirituality, the degree to which their spirituality has impact on their practice, what they see as the merit of spiritual matters in the caring professions, barriers to collaboration among their professions and to addressing these issues with patients, and boundaries beyond which one should not go. One way to read this conversation is to include yourself; that is, to reflect on the points the participants make and the ways in which you might integrate their insights into your personal practice. We hope that you find this task worthwhile and that it provokes further thought and discussion. The discussion began with participant introductions.

Cite this paper

@article{Hatgidakis1997SpiritualityAP, title={Spirituality and practice. Stories, barriers and opportunities. Interview by Laurence A. Savett.}, author={J Hatgidakis and Elizabeth Timko and Gregory A. Plotnikoff and Chris Gale}, journal={Creative nursing}, year={1997}, volume={3 4}, pages={7-11, 16} }