Spiritual care provision to end of life patients: A systematic literature review.

@article{Batstone2020SpiritualCP,
  title={Spiritual care provision to end of life patients: A systematic literature review.},
  author={Elizabeth Batstone and Cara Bailey and Nutmeg Hallett},
  journal={Journal of clinical nursing},
  year={2020}
}
AIM To develop an understanding of how nurses provide spiritual care to terminally ill patients in order to develop best practice. BACKGROUND Patients approaching the end of life (EoL) can experience suffering physically, emotionally, socially and spiritually. Nurses are responsible for assessing these needs and providing holistic care, yet are given little implementable, evidence-based guidance regarding spiritual care. Nurses internationally continue to express inadequacy in assessing and… 
Factors influencing nurse spiritual care practices at the end of life: A systematic review.
TLDR
A range of personal, organizational, and patient-related factors influence nurse provision of spiritual/existential care to end-of-life patients and can be used as inputs to nurse competency frameworks.
Understanding Spiritual Care—Perspectives from Healthcare Professionals in a Norwegian Nursing Home
TLDR
There is a need for an open dialogue about spiritual needs and resources in clinical practice and the teaching of personnel about how to facilitate older people’s spirituality, including practical and non-verbal aspects.
Comparing Nurses’ and Patients’ Comfort Level with Spiritual Assessment
TLDR
Both nurses and patients saw respect and trust as key to building a relationship where open questions related to spirituality can be used as a helpful way to assess patients spiritually.
Effectiveness of an Educational Intervention to Teach Spiritual Care to Spanish Nursing Students
TLDR
The post-intervention results indicated that the programme was effective in improving knowledge, competencies and attitudes related to spiritual care.
Brazilian nurses' concept of religion, religiosity, and spirituality: a qualitative descriptive study.
TLDR
The results indicate that religion, religiosity and spirituality should be incorporated into nurse training; in order to improve the comprehension and competence of nurses in these areas of practice.
The Mutual Effects of Perceived Spiritual Needs on Quality of Life in Patients With Advanced Cancer and Family Caregivers
TLDR
Findings provide insight into the mutuality of spirituality and demonstrate the necessity of providing timely and ongoing spiritual assessment and care in patients with advanced cancer and their family caregivers after being admitted to hospice.
God, spirituality and religion in women dying from gynecological cancer
TLDR
Clinicians should appreciate the patient's concerns, beliefs, fears, spiritual and religious needs and be sensitive to comments that may indicate spiritual distress, and patients who are in spiritual distress should be referred to certified and trained spiritual care professionals, chaplains, counselors and clergy.
Nurses' Experiences of Palliative Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Qualitative Study
TLDR
This study conducted by qualitative content analysis in the neonatal intensive care units of Isfahan, Iran, in 2020 found that nurses' experience of caring for the newborn and their family at the end of life affected their decision-making in this study.
Validity and reliability of the Spiritual Health Scale-Short Form for Turkish nursing students.
TLDR
The SHS-SF was found to be a reliable and valid scale for use in the Turkish language and culture and can be used for evaluating spiritual health levels among Turkish nurses and nursing students.
University of Birmingham Spiritual care provision to end of life patients: A systematic literature review
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References

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TLDR
This qualitative study describes rural and urban palliative/hospice care nurses' communication strategies while providing spiritual care for patients and families at end of life using Braun and Clarke's thematic analysis method.
New Zealand palliative care nurses experiences of providing spiritual care to patients with life-limiting illness.
TLDR
For the nurses in this study, focusing on the individual patient and developing a relationship that enabled the patient's unique spiritual needs to be met was highly valued.
The Spiritual Care Perspectives and Practices of Hospice Nurses
TLDR
This study was undertaken to determine the extent to which nurses in hospice settings, in contrast to nurses in other specialty care areas, personally express spiritual values and integrate spiritual care into their role.
Spiritual care: how to do it
TLDR
An empirical framework is presented providing clinicians with a pragmatic way of incorporating spiritual care into clinical practice, and identifying spiritual care as both a specialised care domain and as a philosophy of care that informs and is embedded within physical and psychosocial care.
Creating a spiritual tapestry: nurses' experiences of delivering spiritual care to patients in an Irish hospice.
TLDR
Nurses' experiences of delivering spiritual support in a palliative care setting in the Republic of Ireland are described, resulting in the creation of a spiritual tapestry that 'weaves' together care and compassion with skills and knowledge in their nursing practice.
Exploring Nurse Communication About Spirituality
TLDR
The spiritual care experiences of oncology nurses are explored in order to learn more about patient needs and nurse responses and illustrate the need to develop a spiritual communication curriculum and provide spiritual care communication training to clinicians.
Discerning the healing path--how nurses assist patient spirituality in diverse health care settings.
TLDR
Spirituality is of relevance for all areas of nursing care, not just dying patients or those in palliative care, and the personal and professional maturity of the nurse is fundamental to his or her willingness and ability to overcome own comfort zone.
Spirituality and spiritual caring: nurses' perspectives and practice in palliative and acute care environments.
TLDR
Palliative care nurses' spiritual perspectives influenced their spiritual caring, and these nurses were older and more career-advanced than the acute care RNs, which may explain the differences observed.
Hospice nurses' perspectives of spirituality.
TLDR
Singapore hospice nurses' perspectives about spirituality and spiritual care were explored to be universal, holistic and existential in nature, and spirituality and care issues can be incorporated in multi-disciplinary team discussions.
Review: The understanding of spirituality and the potential role of spiritual care in end-of-life and palliative care: a meta-study of qualitative research
TLDR
The aim of this study was to synthesize qualitative literature on spirituality and spiritual care at the end of life using a systematic (‘meta-study’) review, incorporating data from 178 patients and 116 healthcare providers, mainly from elderly White and Judaeo-Christian origin patients with cancer.
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