Spiny Norman in the Garden of Eden? Dispersal and early biogeography of Placentalia

@article{Hunter2006SpinyNI,
  title={Spiny Norman in the Garden of Eden? Dispersal and early biogeography of Placentalia},
  author={John P. Hunter and Christine M. Janis},
  journal={Journal of Mammalian Evolution},
  year={2006},
  volume={13},
  pages={89-123}
}
The persistent finding of clades endemic to the southern continents (Afrotheria and Xenarthra) near the base of the placental mammal tree has led molecular phylogeneticists to suggest an origin of Placentalia, the crown group of Eutheria, somewhere in the southern continents. Basal splits within the Placentalia have then been associated with vicariance due to the breakup of Gondwana. Southern-origin scenarios suffer from several problems. First, the place of origin of Placentalia cannot be… Expand
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