Spinal muscular atrophy type 1: A noninvasive respiratory management approach.

@article{Bach2000SpinalMA,
  title={Spinal muscular atrophy type 1: A noninvasive respiratory management approach.},
  author={John R Bach and V. Niranjan and Brian Weaver},
  journal={Chest},
  year={2000},
  volume={117 4},
  pages={
          1100-5
        }
}
STUDY OBJECTIVE To determine whether spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type 1 can be managed without tracheostomy and to compare extubation outcomes using a respiratory muscle aid protocol vs conventional management. DESIGN A retrospective cohort study. METHODS Eleven SMA type 1 children were studied during episodes of respiratory failure. Nine children required multiple intubations. Along with standard treatments, these children received manually and mechanically assisted coughing to reverse… 

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