Spinal cord stimulation for patients with failed back surgery syndrome or complex regional pain syndrome: a systematic review of effectiveness and complications

@article{Turner2004SpinalCS,
  title={Spinal cord stimulation for patients with failed back surgery syndrome or complex regional pain syndrome: a systematic review of effectiveness and complications},
  author={Judith Axler Turner and John D. Loeser and Richard A. Deyo and Stacy B. Sanders},
  journal={Pain},
  year={2004},
  volume={108},
  pages={137-147}
}
We conducted a systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in relieving pain and improving functioning for patients with failed back surgery syndrome and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS. [...] Key Method Literature searches yielded 583 articles, of which seven met the inclusion criteria for the review of SCS effectiveness, and 15 others met the criteria only for the review of SCS complications.Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
This study seeks to evaluate the use of intermittent dosing as an alternative paradigm patients with DRG stimulation in place for at least 1 year who now endorse decreasing… Expand
ConditionsCRPS (Complex Regional Pain Syndromes), Peripheral Neuropathy, Radiculopathy
InterventionDevice
Interventional Clinical Trial
Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) delivered at 10kHz frequency (HF10 Therapy) has demonstrated superiority to traditional SCS for leg and back pain. Intermittent dosing (ID) refers to the… Expand
ConditionsChronic Low-back Pain, CRPS, Peripheral Neuropathy
InterventionDevice
Interventional Clinical Trial
Parkinson Disease (PD) patients experience a variety of motor issues such as walking difficulties, loss of balance, and freezing while walking, which impacts their quality of life… Expand
ConditionsParkinson Disease
InterventionDevice
Interventional Clinical Trial
Chronic pain is correlated with alterations in the structure and function of the brain, developed according to the phenotype of pain. Still today, the data on functional… Expand
ConditionsFailed Back Surgery Syndrome
InterventionDevice
Clinical Evidence for Spinal Cord Stimulation for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (FBSS): Systematic Review
TLDR
Clinical evidence suggests that for patients with FBSS, repeated surgery will not likely offer relief, and evidence suggests long-term use of opioid pain medications is not effective in this population, likely presents additional complications, and requires strict management. Expand
Spinal cord stimulation for patients with failed back surgery syndrome: a systematic review.
TLDR
This systematic review evaluating the effectiveness of SCS in relieving chronic intractable pain of failed back surgery syndrome indicated the evidence to be Level II-1 or II-2 for clinical use on a long-term basis. Expand
Effect of spinal cord stimulation for chronic complex regional pain syndrome Type I: five-year final follow-up of patients in a randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
Despite the diminishing effectiveness of SCS over time, 95% of patients with an implant would repeat the treatment for the same result, and results similar to those following PT for pain relief and all other measured variables at 5 years posttreatment. Expand
Systematic Review of the (Cost-)effectiveness of Spinal Cord Stimulation for People With Failed Back Surgery Syndrome
TLDR
These studies show that SCS is effective in the treatment of FBSS in terms of pain reduction, and there is an initial high cost associated with device implantation and maintenance. Expand
Spinal cord stimulation for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome leads to improvement of quality of life, reduction of pain and psychological distress: a retrospective case series with 24 months follow up
TLDR
It is concluded that SCS is an alternative option to relieve chronic pain and psychological distress originating from CRPS if non-invasive managements of severe CRPS failed and is anAlternative option to improve the quality of life and relieve chronicPain originating from severeCRPS if conservative treatment modalities fail. Expand
Spinal cord stimulation versus conventional medical management for neuropathic pain: A multicentre randomised controlled trial in patients with failed back surgery syndrome
TLDR
In selected patients with FBSS, SCS provides better pain relief and improves health‐related quality of life and functional capacity compared with CMM alone. Expand
Spinal cord stimulation for failed back surgery syndrome: Outcomes in a workers’ compensation setting
TLDR
It is found that there is no evidence for greater effectiveness of SCS versus alternative treatments in this patient population after 6 months, and both trial and permanent SCS were associated with adverse events. Expand
THE EFFECTS OF SPINAL CORD STIMULATION IN NEUROPATHIC PAIN ARE SUSTAINED: A 24‐MONTH FOLLOW‐UP OF THE PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED MULTICENTER TRIAL OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SPINAL CORD STIMULATION
TLDR
At 24 months of SCS treatment, selected failed back surgery syndrome patients reported sustained pain relief, clinically important improvements in functional capacity and health-related quality of life, and satisfaction with treatment. Expand
Effectiveness of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Spinal Pain: A Systematic Review.
TLDR
There is significant (Level I to II) evidence of the efficacy of spinal cord stimulation in lumbar FBSS; whereas, there is moderate (Level II to III) evidence for high frequency stimulation; there is limited evidence for adaptive stimulation and burst stimulation. Expand
Predictors of Pain Relief Following Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Back and Leg Pain and Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis
TLDR
This review supports SCS as an effective pain relieving treatment for CBLP with predominant leg pain with or without a prior history of back surgery and Randomized controlled trials need to confirm the effectiveness and cost‐effectiveness of SCS in the CLBP population with predominant low back pain. Expand
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References

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Spinal cord stimulation for chronic low back pain: a systematic literature synthesis.
TLDR
It seems that approximately 50 to 60% of patients with failed back surgery syndrome report > 50% pain relief with the use of spinal cord stimulation at follow-up; the lack of randomized trials precludes conclusions concerning the effectiveness of spinal Cord stimulation relative to other treatments, placebo, or no treatment. Expand
A prospective, randomized study of spinal cord stimulation versus reoperation for failed back surgery syndrome: initial results.
TLDR
A prospective, randomized comparison of SCS and reoperation in patients with persistent radicular pain, with and without low back pain, following lumboscral spine surgery shows a statistically significant advantage for SCS over reoperation. Expand
Spinal cord stimulation in patients with chronic reflex sympathetic dystrophy.
TLDR
In carefully selected patients with chronic reflex sympathetic dystrophy, electrical stimulation of the spinal cord can reduce pain and improve the health-related quality of life. Expand
Spinal Cord Stimulation for Chronic Pain of Spinal Origin: A Valuable Long-Term Solution
TLDR
The ultimate efficacy of spinal cord stimulation remains to be determined, primarily because of limitations associated with the published literature, but on the basis of the current evidence, it may represent a valuable treatment option, particularly for patients with chronic pain of predominately neuropathic origin and topographical distribution involving the extremities. Expand
Prospective Outcome Evaluation of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Patients With Intractable Leg Pain
TLDR
Spinal cord stimulation implantation can result in improved physical function and decreased pain in patients who are carefully screened and in whom the implantation is performed with the patient awake to help ensure optimal pain‐relieving lead placement. Expand
Prospective, Multicenter Study of Spinal Cord Stimulation for Relief of Chronic Back and Extremity Pain
TLDR
Spinal cord stimulation successfully managed pain in 55% of patients on whom 1‐year follow‐up is available, confirming that spinal cord stimulation can be an effective therapy for management of chronic low back and extremity pain. Expand
Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Failed Back Syndrome
TLDR
Spinal cord stimulation should be considered as an important therapeutic modality in carefully selected patients with failed back syndrome. Expand
Economic evaluation of spinal cord stimulation for chronic reflex sympathetic dystrophy
TLDR
SCS was both more effective and less costly than the standard treatment protocol for chronic RSD and in the lifetime analysis, SCS per patient is $60,000 cheaper than control therapy. Expand
Treatment of Chronic Pain with Spinal Cord Stimulation versus Alternative Therapies: Cost-effectiveness Analysis
TLDR
SCS is cost-effective in the long term, despite the initial high costs of the implantable devices, compared with best medical treatment/conventional pain therapy. Expand
Spinal cord stimulation is effective in the management of reflex sympathetic dystrophy.
TLDR
The low morbidity of this procedure and its efficacy in patients with refractory pain related to RSD suggest that SCS is superior to ablative sympathectomy in the management of RSD. Expand
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