Spiders of medical importance in the Asia–Pacific: Atracotoxin, latrotoxin and related spider neurotoxins

@article{Nicholson2002SpidersOM,
  title={Spiders of medical importance in the Asia–Pacific: Atracotoxin, latrotoxin and related spider neurotoxins},
  author={G. Nicholson and A. Graudins},
  journal={Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={29}
}
1. The spiders of medical importance in the Asia–Pacific region include widow (family Theridiidae) and Australian funnel‐web spiders (subfamily Atracinae). In addition, cupboard (family Theridiidae) and Australian mouse spiders (family Actinopodidae) may contain neurotoxins responsible for serious systemic envenomation. Fortunately, there appears to be extensive cross‐reactivity of species‐specific widow spider antivenom within the family Theridiidae. Moreover, Sydney funnel‐web antivenom has… Expand
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