Spider peptide toxins as leads for drug development

@article{Escoubas2007SpiderPT,
  title={Spider peptide toxins as leads for drug development},
  author={Pierre Escoubas and Frank Bosmans},
  journal={Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery},
  year={2007},
  volume={2},
  pages={823 - 835}
}
Venomous animals use a highly complex cocktails of proteins, peptides and small molecules to subdue and kill their prey. As such, venoms represent highly valuable combinatorial peptide libraries, displaying an extensive range of pharmacological activities, honed by natural selection. Modern analytical technologies enable us to take full advantage of this vast pharmacological cornucopia in the hunt for novel drug leads. Spider venoms represent a resource of several million peptides, which… 
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