Spider-fed bromeliads: seasonal and interspecific variation in plant performance.

@article{Gonalves2011SpiderfedBS,
  title={Spider-fed bromeliads: seasonal and interspecific variation in plant performance.},
  author={Ana Zangirolame Gonçalves and Helenice Mercier and Paulo Mazzafera and Gustavo Quevedo Romero},
  journal={Annals of botany},
  year={2011},
  volume={107 6},
  pages={
          1047-55
        }
}
BACKGROUND AND AIMS Several animals that live on bromeliads can contribute to plant nutrition through nitrogen provisioning (digestive mutualism). The bromeliad-living spider Psecas chapoda (Salticidae) inhabits and breeds on Bromelia balansae in regions of South America, but in specific regions can also appear on Ananas comosus (pineapple) plantations and Aechmea distichantha. METHODS Using isotopic and physiological methods in greenhouse experiments, the role of labelled ((15)N) spider… 
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ASSIMILAÇÃO DO NITROGÊNIO EM FOLHAS DE Vriesea gigantea (BROMELIACEAE) DURANTE A TRANSIÇÃO ONTOGENÉTICA DO HÁBITO ATMOSFÉRICO PARA O EPÍFITO COM TANQUE
The stages of ontogenetic development of bromeliad can be an important feature to be considered in the physiology studies because the young plants can be classified as atmospheric bromeliads, while
Coprophagous features in carnivorous Nepenthes plants: a task for ureases
TLDR
Ureases are revealed as an emblematic example for an efficient, low-cost but high adaptive plasticity in plants while developing a further specialized lifestyle from carnivory to coprophagy.
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