Sperm precedence and sperm storage in multiply mated red flour beetles

@article{Lewis1998SpermPA,
  title={Sperm precedence and sperm storage in multiply mated red flour beetles},
  author={S. Lewis and E. Jutkiewicz},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1998},
  volume={43},
  pages={365-369}
}
Abstract In insects, the last male to mate with a female often gains access to a disproportionate number of subsequent fertilizations. This study examined last-male sperm precedence patterns in doubly and triply mated Tribolium castaneum females. Sperm storage processes were investigated by measuring the quantity of sperm stored within the female spermatheca following single, double, and triple matings. Both doubly mated and triply mated females exhibited high last-male sperm precedence for… Expand

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