Sperm competition or sperm selection: no evidence for female influence over paternity in yellow dung flies Scatophaga stercoraria

@article{Simmons1996SpermCO,
  title={Sperm competition or sperm selection: no evidence for female influence over paternity in yellow dung flies Scatophaga stercoraria},
  author={L. Simmons and P. Stockley and R. L. Jackson and G. Parker},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1996},
  volume={38},
  pages={199-206}
}
Abstract Recent studies of non-random paternity have suggested that sperm selection by females may influence male fertilization success. Here we argue that the problems originally encountered in partitioning variation in non-random mating between male competition and female choice are even more pertinent to interpreting patterns of non-random paternity because of intense sperm competition between males. We describe an experiment with the yellow dung fly, Scatophaga stercoraria, designed to… Expand

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