Sperm competition between Drosophila males involves both displacement and incapacitation

@article{Price1999SpermCB,
  title={Sperm competition between Drosophila males involves both displacement and incapacitation},
  author={C. Price and K. Dyer and J. Coyne},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1999},
  volume={400},
  pages={449-452}
}
Females in almost all animal groups copulate with multiple males,. This behaviour allows different males to compete for fertilization and gives females the opportunity to mediate this competition. In many animals and most insects, the second male to copulate with a female typically sires most of her offspring,,. In Drosophila melanogaster, this second-male sperm precedence has long been studied but, as in most species, its mechanism has remained unknown. Here we show, using labelled sperm in… Expand
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ON SEMINAL FLUID AND MEIOTIC DRIVE
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This work examined female remating with respect to sperm competition and sexual selection in Drosophila and addressed the possible benefits for females, and reviewed the role of accessory gland fluid in remating. Expand
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It is shown that the last male sperm precedence occurs by sperm displacement operating at both sperm ejaculation and storage sites, and that ejaculate size in the bursa copulatrix by the second male, and sperm stratification and flushing in the spermatheca, do not play a role in lastmale sperm precedence. Expand
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