Sperm competition and variation in zebra mating behavior

@article{Ginsberg2004SpermCA,
  title={Sperm competition and variation in zebra mating behavior},
  author={Joshua Ross Ginsberg and Daniel I. Rubenstein},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={26},
  pages={427-434}
}
SummaryData are presented on the breeding behavior of two zebra species to test whether intra- and interspecific variation in male reproductive behavior and physiology are correlated with differences in female promiscuity. [] Key Result When mating with promiscuous mares, Grevy's zebra stallions made a greater investment in reproductive behavior (calling, mounting, ejaculations) than did stallions of either species when mating with monandrous females. The evolution of large testes size in the Grevy's zebra…
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This mini review aims at providing an update of the role of sperm traits in species–specific strategies for post-coital sperm competence, showing that the straight-line velocity value, the most accurate estimate of sperm cell velocity, is of great importance in competition scenarios.
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