Sperm Storage in the Female Reproductive Tract.

@article{Holt2016SpermSI,
  title={Sperm Storage in the Female Reproductive Tract.},
  author={William Vincent Holt and Alireza Fazeli},
  journal={Annual review of animal biosciences},
  year={2016},
  volume={4},
  pages={
          291-310
        }
}
  • W. Holt, A. Fazeli
  • Published 2016
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Annual review of animal biosciences
The capacity for sperm storage within the female reproductive tract occurs widely across all groups of vertebrate species and is exceptionally well developed in some reptiles (maximum duration seven years) and fishes (maximum duration >1 year). Although there are many reports on both the occurrence of female sperm storage in diverse species and its adaptive benefits, few studies have been directed toward explaining the mechanisms involved. In this article we review recent findings in birds and… Expand
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Although there are many reports on both the occurrence of female sperm storage and its adaptive benefits, few studies have been directed toward explaining the mechanisms involved and it is surprising that none have yet been elucidated by technologists wishing to improve the long-term storage of fresh semen. Expand
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