Speed and Capacity of Language Processing Test: Normative Data From an Older American Community-Dwelling Sample

@article{Saxton2001SpeedAC,
  title={Speed and Capacity of Language Processing Test: Normative Data From an Older American Community-Dwelling Sample},
  author={Judith A. Saxton and Graham Ratcliff and H H Dodge and Rajesh S Pandav and Alan D Baddeley and Mary Ganguli},
  journal={Applied Neuropsychology},
  year={2001},
  volume={8},
  pages={193 - 203}
}
This study presents normative data for the Speed and Capacity of Language Processing (SCOLP) test from an older American sample. The SCOLP comprises 2 subtests: Spot-the-Word, a lexical decision task, providing an estimate of premorbid intelligence, and Speed of Comprehension, providing a measure of information processing speed. Slowed performance may result from normal aging, brain damage (e.g., head injury), or dementing disorders or may represent the intact performance of someone who always… Expand
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