Speech perception.

@article{Diehl2004SpeechP,
  title={Speech perception.},
  author={Randy L. Diehl and Andrew Lotto and Lori L. Holt},
  journal={Annual review of psychology},
  year={2004},
  volume={55},
  pages={
          149-79
        }
}
This chapter focuses on one of the first steps in comprehending spoken language: How do listeners extract the most fundamental linguistic elements-consonants and vowels, or the distinctive features which compose them-from the acoustic signal? We begin by describing three major theoretical perspectives on the perception of speech. Then we review several lines of research that are relevant to distinguishing these perspectives. The research topics surveyed include categorical perception, phonetic… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

Topics in speech perception
TLDR
A complete theory of speech perception should systematically map how speech acoustic information is processed bottom-up through the peripheral and central auditory system, as well as how linguistic knowledge interacts top-down with the acoustic-phonetic information to extract meaning.
Speech Perception: Adult
Speech Perception
Is speech special? This chapter evaluates the evidence that speech perception is distinctive when compared with non-linguistic auditory perception. It addresses the phenomenology, contents, objects,
Speech Perception: A Review
Speech perception deals with how a listener is able to comprehend the underlying meaning of an utterance. Speech perception has long been researched and various attempts to understand and present a
Speech perception as categorization
TLDR
It is argued that SP is best understood as perceptual categorization, a position that places SP in direct contact with research from other areas of perception and cognition.
Speech perception.
  • A. Samuel
  • Physics
    Annual review of psychology
  • 2011
TLDR
There is a growing appreciation of the need to understand how the perceptual system dynamically changes in order to allow listeners to successfully process the variable input and new words that they constantly encounter.
Acoustic and auditory phonetics: the adaptive design of speech sound systems
  • R. Diehl
  • Physics
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2007
TLDR
How acoustic and auditory properties of vowels and consonants help to ensure intelligibility is examined to suggest certain aspects of quantal and dispersion theories can be unified in a principled way so as to achieve reasonable predictive accuracy.
Regressive spectral assimilation bias in speech perception
TLDR
Listeners consistently heard the first sound as spectrally similar to the second sound in a manner suggesting that they construed the transitions between the two as evidence about the identity of the first, when the signal was not sufficiently informative for them to do otherwise.
Are the objects of speech perception articulatory gestures or auditory qualities ? 10 April 2009 Perceptual compensation for coarticulation : Implications for theories of speech perception
Accounts of speech perception differ on whether vocal tract gestures (Fowler, 1986, e.g.) or the acoustic signal itself (Diehl, Lotto, and Holt, 2004) constitute the proper objects of speech
Factors affecting the perception of noise-vocoded speech: stimulus properties and listener variability.
This thesis presents an investigation of two general factors affecting speech perception in normal-hearing adults. Two sets of experiments are described, in which speakers of English are presented
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 161 REFERENCES
Studies on the categorization of speech by infants
Listeners do hear sounds, not tongues.
  • C. Fowler
  • Philosophy
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 1996
The paper first distinguishes the two perceptual theories, the motor theory and the theory of direct perception, that nearly agree in the claim that listeners to speech perceive vocal tract gestures.
The perception of phonetic gestures
We have titled our presentation "The perception of phonetic gestures" as if phonetic gestures are perceived. By phonetic gestures we refer to organized movements of one or more vocal-tract structures
Speech perception is hearing sounds, not tongues.
  • J. Ohala
  • Physics
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 1996
TLDR
Phonological data show unmistakably that the acoustic-auditory properties of speech sounds, not their articulations, are the primary determinant of their behavior.
On levels of description in speech research.
  • B. Repp
  • Physics, Linguistics
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 1981
TLDR
The present paper serves as a remainder that linguistic categories are abstract and have no physical properties, and that their physical correlates in the speech wave are appropriately described in acoustic terms only.
Segmentation of coarticulated speech in perception
  • C. Fowler
  • Physics
    Perception & psychophysics
  • 1984
The research investigates how listeners segment the acoustic speech signal into phonetic segments and explores implications that the segmentation strategy may have for their perception of the
Auditory and linguistic processing of cues for place of articulation by infants
Two- and 3-month-old infants were found to discriminate the acoustic cues for the phonetic feature of place of articulation in a categorical manner; that is, evidence for the discriminability of two
Real Objects of Speech Perception: A Commentary on Diehl and Kluender
I agree with Diehl and Kluender (1989) that perceptual constraints guide the development of sound inventories and of phonological processes in languages. I disagree that these constraints are primary
...
1
2
3
4
5
...