Spectrum-driven Planetary Deglaciation Due to Increases in Stellar Luminosity

@article{Shields2014SpectrumdrivenPD,
  title={Spectrum-driven Planetary Deglaciation Due to Increases in Stellar Luminosity},
  author={A. Shields and C. Bitz and V. Meadows and M. Joshi and T. Robinson},
  journal={arXiv: Earth and Planetary Astrophysics},
  year={2014}
}
Distant planets in globally ice-covered, "snowball", states may depend on increases in their host stars' luminosity to become hospitable for surface life. Using a General Circulation Model (GCM), we simulated the equilibrium climate response of a planet to a range of instellations from an F-, G-, or M- dwarf star. The range of instellation that permits both complete ice cover and at least partially ice-free climate states is a measure of the climate hysteresis that a planet can exhibit. An ice… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Decrease in hysteresis of planetary climate for planets with long solar days
Energy Budgets for Terrestrial Extrasolar Planets.
Hydrohalite Salt-albedo Feedback Could Cool M-dwarf Planets
The Habitability of Planets Orbiting M-dwarf Stars
No Snowball on Habitable Tidally Locked Planets with a Dynamic Ocean
The habitability of stagnant-lid Earths around dwarf stars
Albedos, Equilibrium Temperatures, and Surface Temperatures of Habitable Planets.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 28 REFERENCES
HABITABLE CLIMATES : THE INFLUENCE OF OBLIQUITY
GENERALIZED MILANKOVITCH CYCLES AND LONG-TERM CLIMATIC HABITABILITY
Habitable zones around main sequence stars.
Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars
  • Yongyun Hu, J. Yang
  • Medicine, Geology
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2013
Habitable planets with high obliquities.
Discovery of a cool planet of 5.5 Earth masses through gravitational microlensing
...
1
2
3
...