Spectral organization of the eye of a butterfly, Papilio

@article{Arikawa2003SpectralOO,
  title={Spectral organization of the eye of a butterfly, Papilio},
  author={Kentaro Arikawa},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  year={2003},
  volume={189},
  pages={791-800}
}
  • K. Arikawa
  • Published 30 September 2003
  • Biology
  • Journal of Comparative Physiology A
This review outlines our recent studies on the spectral organization of butterfly compound eyes, with emphasis on the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, which is the most extensively studied species. Papilio has color vision when searching for nectar among flowers, and their compound eyes are furnished with six distinct classes of spectral receptors (UV, violet, blue, green, red, broadband). The compound eyes consist of many ommatidia, each containing nine photoreceptor… 

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