Spectral heterogeneity of honeybee ommatidia

@article{Wakakuwa2005SpectralHO,
  title={Spectral heterogeneity of honeybee ommatidia},
  author={Motohiro Wakakuwa and Masumi Kurasawa and Martin Giurfa and Kentaro Arikawa},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2005},
  volume={92},
  pages={464-467}
}
The honeybee compound eye is equipped with ultraviolet, blue, and green receptors, which form the physiological basis of a trichromatic color vision system. We studied the distribution of the spectral receptors by localizing the three mRNAs encoding the opsins of the ultraviolet-, blue- and green-absorbing visual pigments. The expression patterns of the three opsin mRNAs demonstrated that three distinct types ommatidia exist, refuting the common assumption that the ommatidia composing the bee… 
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  • 2008
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